Events Calendar

July 4, 2021 - 10:00am - 4:00pm

The garden will be closed on July 4, 2021.

July 6, 2021 - 10:30am

June 11 - Bugs

Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:15 am
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Sessions meet outdoors. In the event of rain, a make-up session will meet the following week.

Tuesdays in the Garden, designed for children aged 1-3, provides a nurturing environment where children’s curiosity and wonder are extended through play and exploration, and children and their caregivers learn and discover side-by-side. Join art educators Claudia Orjuela and Denice Niebuhr for hands-on art making and all-senses-engaged exploration of the outdoor world at Lynden. We’ll consider different themes, each designed to connect Lynden’s environment with children’s interests. We will encourage experimentation and the manipulation of art and natural materials to tell stories, solve problems, and develop relationships. Masks required for adults. Social distancing will be practiced at all times. To view our Guidelines for Parent-and-Child, Youth Workshops, click here.

Fee: Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): $12/9 members for one adult and one child.
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): $16/$12 members for one adult and one child.
Registration: Registration: Group size is limited; advance registration is required. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration does not guarantee admission. Once we receive your completed registration form, we will follow up via e-mail with an invoice for payment and a confirmation after payment is received OR a notification that you have been placed on the waiting list for the session(s) you have requested. Register online now.

Schedule:

Sessions in red are full. To be added to the waitlist, complete registration here.
March 9 - Signs of Spring
April 13 - Trees are Our Friends
April 27 - Trees are Our Friends
May 11 - Gardening at Lynden
May 25 - Gardening at Lynden
June 8 - Seed Bombs
June 15 - Seed Bombs
June 22 - Garden Animals
June 29 - Garden Animals
July 6 - Pond Critters
July 13 - Pond Critters
July 20 - Plant Dyes
July 27 - Plant Dyes
August 3 - Nature's Kitchen
August 10 - Nature’s Kitchen
August 17 - Wearable Camouflage
August 24 - Wearable Camouflage

July 10, 2021 - 12:00pm - 5:00pm

Music1

Visitors to Lynden must adhere to our social distance walking visitor guidelines.
FREE

This year, we are offering HOME 2021 as a series of dispersed events spanning the summer. These events will be small, in order to conform with public health guidelines, and will take place outdoors on Lynden’s grounds. We hope that these events, when taken together, will capture the spirit of art, food, and performance that we experienced at the HOME 2019 outdoor festival.

PROGRAM
12pm - Congo Gospel Music Band (Congolese)
1pm - Karen Milwaukee Music Band (Burmese)
1.30pm - Qays Alakeidy (Iraqi)
2pm - Golden Melody Music Band U.S.A (Burmese)
3pm - Spring Star Music Band (Burmese)
4pm - Samba Da Vida (Afro-Brazilian percussion)

Program and timing are subject to change.

Golden Melody Music Band U.S.A. (Burmese) is led by Burmese Muslim Mohammad Hasan alongside volunteer singers, and managed by Burmese grassroots community worker Moe Aung. Hasan captures his audience with a nostalgic style and persona, both poised and enigmatic, and with sounds of yesteryear. He plays international music, oldies, and classic rock songs in Myanmar, English and Hindi (Bollywood). Hasan and his rotating band members perform at farmer’s markets, community fundraisers, and practically anywhere that they are called for. At the Lynden Sculpture Garden, Golden Melody has performed at HOME celebrations since 2019. In 2021, inspired by community activism and the Spring Revolution in his homeland and locally, Hasan has expanded his line-up to include new band members and new music representing the diverse ethnic groups of Myanmar, calling themselves the Spring Star Music Band. Hasan as band advisor and music arranger is joined by musicians from the Karen, Kachin, Chin, and Burmese community.

Karen Milwaukee Music Band (Burmese), organized by Saw Klo Futurestar, performs popular songs in the Karen and Burmese community ranging from spiritual to pop music. A supporter of community directed events, the Karen Milwaukee Music Band joins the HOME celebrations in 2021 in a karaoke-style performance--popular at intimate gatherings but ideal for a community celebration of this size.

Originally from Baghdad, Iraq, Qays Alakeidy is a graphic designer and a musician. He began fine art school and studied filmmaking in his home country, and continues his pursuit at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee in graphic design. As an acoustic guitarist, his musical interest is in flamenco and rumba, and his sound can be described as soulful and profound. His motto is "Never stop learning. Never stop creating".

Based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Congo Gospel Music Band (Congolese) is led and organized by drummer and frontliner Bodack Mondembe. Based at their local church, Congo Gospel Music Band also performs at street and neighborhood events, churches and weddings, and community-led events. They have performed at Beet Street, the annual Fall Harvest Festival by Cactus Club, Friends of Zion worship concert at Benediction Lutheran Church, as well as at HOME World Refugee Day celebrations at the Lynden Sculpture Garden. Their album and music video is forthcoming, and their sound, described as rhythmical, upbeat and infectious, is in high demand.

Milwaukee’s own Brazilian Samba school since 2010 and part of the International Grooversity drumming network spearheaded by Marcus Santos (Grooversity.com), Samba Da Vida MKE (Afro-Brazilian percussion) brings together people of all ages to celebrate the Afro-Brazilian and Carnaval traditions of Salvador da Bahia, Rio, and São Paulo. Directed by Julio Pabón and Bony Plog-Benavides, SDV MKE is featured in parades and performances throughout greater Milwaukee and focuses on maintaining and promoting the rich musical culture of Brazil. https://www.facebook.com/SambadaVidaMKE/

For a complete listing of HOME 2021 events, click here.

July 11, 2021 - 8:30am - 10:00am

Photo: Sarah Zimmerman

Fee: $10/$5 members. For the safety of all concerned, you must register in advance. Click here to register. For the July 11 session, register by phone at 414-446-8794.

Join poet and birder Chuck Stebelton the second Sunday of each month (in August, it will be the first Sunday of the month) for a small-group, socially distanced bird walk on the grounds. Keeping to the perimeter of the garden, we’ll watch for seasonal migrants and resident bird species and seek out the best bird habitats to identify as many species as we can. Please dress for the weather and plan to walk in varied terrain. Bring your binoculars if you have them; no previous birding experience required.

About the Artist

Chuck Stebelton is author of An Apostle Island (Oxeye Press, forthcoming) and two previous full-length collections of poetry. As a birder and Wisconsin Master Naturalist volunteer he has offered interpretive hikes for conservancy groups and arts organizations including Friends of Cedarburg Bog, Milwaukee Audubon Society, Woodland Pattern Book Center, Friends of Lorine Niedecker, and the Lynden Sculpture Garden. He edits Partly Press for Lynden Sculpture Garden and is currently a participant in Lynden's residency program.

July 13, 2021 - 10:30am

June 11 - Bugs

Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:15 am
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Sessions meet outdoors. In the event of rain, a make-up session will meet the following week.

Tuesdays in the Garden, designed for children aged 1-3, provides a nurturing environment where children’s curiosity and wonder are extended through play and exploration, and children and their caregivers learn and discover side-by-side. Join art educators Claudia Orjuela and Denice Niebuhr for hands-on art making and all-senses-engaged exploration of the outdoor world at Lynden. We’ll consider different themes, each designed to connect Lynden’s environment with children’s interests. We will encourage experimentation and the manipulation of art and natural materials to tell stories, solve problems, and develop relationships. Masks required for adults. Social distancing will be practiced at all times. To view our Guidelines for Parent-and-Child, Youth Workshops, click here.

Fee: Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): $12/9 members for one adult and one child.
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): $16/$12 members for one adult and one child.
Registration: Registration: Group size is limited; advance registration is required. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration does not guarantee admission. Once we receive your completed registration form, we will follow up via e-mail with an invoice for payment and a confirmation after payment is received OR a notification that you have been placed on the waiting list for the session(s) you have requested. Register online now.

Schedule:

Sessions in red are full. To be added to the waitlist, complete registration here.
March 9 - Signs of Spring
April 13 - Trees are Our Friends
April 27 - Trees are Our Friends
May 11 - Gardening at Lynden
May 25 - Gardening at Lynden
June 8 - Seed Bombs
June 15 - Seed Bombs
June 22 - Garden Animals
June 29 - Garden Animals
July 6 - Pond Critters
July 13 - Pond Critters
July 20 - Plant Dyes
July 27 - Plant Dyes
August 3 - Nature's Kitchen
August 10 - Nature’s Kitchen
August 17 - Wearable Camouflage
August 24 - Wearable Camouflage

July 14, 2021 - 7:00pm - 7:30pm

Conversations with Ourselves

FREE
This is a virtual event.
Watch live on our Facebook page.

Wednesday, April 14, 7:00pm – 7:30pm: Sumeya Osman (USA) in conversation with Joyeux Mugisho (Uganda)
Wednesday, May 12, 7:00pm – 7:30pm: Paul Vang (Milwaukee, WI) in conversation with May June Paw (Milwaukee, WI)
Wednesday, June 9, 7:00pm – 7:30pm: Kim Khaira (Milwaukee, WI, USA) in conversation with Komeil Zarin (Malaysia)
Wednesday, July 14, 7:00pm-7:30pm: Komeil Zarin (Malaysia) in conversation with Amal Haj Sleman (Malaysia)

As we approach World Refugee Day 2021, Lynden’s community engagement specialist Kim Khaira will screen interviews from our HOME: Conversations with Ourselves series on one Wednesday evening each month on our Facebook page. HOME: Conversations with Ourselves is an interview project of the HOME steering committee at Lynden. The interviews were designed to give voice to refugees and began as part of the virtual work on the HOME platform in 2020. Interviewers are refugees who have resettled to the United States, and their interviewees include both friends and family who are based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as well as those who remain overseas. These interviews are reflections of relationships and conversations that we continue to have long after resettlement; they explore issues that our refugee friends and family members continue to face as they remain in their country of origin or interim country.

July 17, 2021 - 10:00am - 4:00pm

Photo: Molly Rosenblum/Sam LaStrapes/Kodah

Visitors must adhere to our social distance walking visitor guidelines.

Bring your canine friends for an afternoon of romping in the garden.

July 17, 2021 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Milkweed

Upcoming sessions:
Saturday, August 14, 2021 - registration is closed
Saturday, September 11, 2021
Saturday, October 9, 2021
Saturday, November 13, 2021

Fee: Free.
Registration: Space is limited; advance registration required. Click here to register.

Native herbalist and artist-in-residence Angela Kingsawan of Yenepa Herbs leads a series of guided tours of Lynden's narrative gardens. There are several gardens at Lynden that tell stories of specific cultures and moments in history. Join us each month for a fun and informative outing to learn about the plants identified and cultivated by Kingsawan that hold significance as food, medicine, and tradition within the exchange and migration of refugee, immigrant, and Indigenous communities.

About Angela Kingsawan
Angela Kingsawan is an Indigenous person of Raramuri, Tigua, and Mexica descent. She has been a Community Health Worker for many years and draws on her experience as an herbalist, yogini, reiki practitioner, full-spectrum doula, writer, artist, and mother to help uplift Communities of Culture throughout Wisconsin. She was born and raised on the south side of Milwaukee and uses her unique perspective as an urban Native person to teach modern herbalism infused with Native tradition. By providing decolonized education, seed exchanges, and growing culturally significant plants in an urban setting, Kingsawan strives to help community members remember their cultural ways of being. Angela’s residency project at Lynden, Materia Medica of the Ancients: Connecting to Beauty, Blessings, and Breath draws on her personal journey of decolonization and cross-cultural learning to honor Indigenous teachings from around the globe.

July 20, 2021 - 10:30am

June 11 - Bugs

Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:15 am
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Sessions meet outdoors. In the event of rain, a make-up session will meet the following week.

Tuesdays in the Garden, designed for children aged 1-3, provides a nurturing environment where children’s curiosity and wonder are extended through play and exploration, and children and their caregivers learn and discover side-by-side. Join art educators Claudia Orjuela and Denice Niebuhr for hands-on art making and all-senses-engaged exploration of the outdoor world at Lynden. We’ll consider different themes, each designed to connect Lynden’s environment with children’s interests. We will encourage experimentation and the manipulation of art and natural materials to tell stories, solve problems, and develop relationships. Masks required for adults. Social distancing will be practiced at all times. To view our Guidelines for Parent-and-Child, Youth Workshops, click here.

Fee: Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): $12/9 members for one adult and one child.
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): $16/$12 members for one adult and one child.
Registration: Registration: Group size is limited; advance registration is required. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration does not guarantee admission. Once we receive your completed registration form, we will follow up via e-mail with an invoice for payment and a confirmation after payment is received OR a notification that you have been placed on the waiting list for the session(s) you have requested. Register online now.

Schedule:

Sessions in red are full. To be added to the waitlist, complete registration here.
March 9 - Signs of Spring
April 13 - Trees are Our Friends
April 27 - Trees are Our Friends
May 11 - Gardening at Lynden
May 25 - Gardening at Lynden
June 8 - Seed Bombs
June 15 - Seed Bombs
June 22 - Garden Animals
June 29 - Garden Animals
July 6 - Pond Critters
July 13 - Pond Critters
July 20 - Plant Dyes
July 27 - Plant Dyes
August 3 - Nature's Kitchen
August 10 - Nature’s Kitchen
August 17 - Wearable Camouflage
August 24 - Wearable Camouflage

July 23, 2021 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

fullmoonsoundbath


Fee: $25/$20 members
Registration: Registration is closed. Registration is open for the August 23, September 17, and October 17 sessions.

The full moon is a time for releasing and cleansing. The light of the full moon illuminates any obstacles or interferences in our lives. Once we recognize our blocks, it becomes easier to let go of what didn’t serve us in the most recent lunar phase. It is an amazing time to reevaluate and recollect. Join artist-in-residence Jenna Knapp to celebrate the summer solstice with a healing sound bath followed by a candle-lit labyrinth walk. Sound baths are an ancient form of deep meditation; they include various ambient sounds playing in a space where you can hear and feel their vibrations. Your sound healer for the evening will be Milwaukee’s own Sevan Arabajian-Lawson (Cat Ries), initiated by Akhilanka of the Temple of Singing Bowls in Mysore, India. The sound bath last approximately 45-60 minutes. Please bring your own yoga mat, blanket, or towel to rest on for the duration, and dress appropriately for the weather. Candles will be provided for the labyrinth walk, but feel free to bring your own.

July 24, 2021 - 10:00am - 1:00pm

Free but space is limited and preregistration is required. Register by phone at 414-446-8794.

IN THE HEALING LANGUAGE OF TREES brings Daniel Minter to Lynden for multiple residencies across two summers to engage the communities we serve in “a natural act of transformation restructured for curing many ills.” Minter’s original idea—to bring his wood-carving skills to bear on the deadly impact of emerald ash borer on our trees—was complicated by the pandemic. Drawing on traditions of the African Diaspora, and invoking axé, the “spiritual force that resides in all living things,” Minter envisions an ash trunk adorned with necklaces of giant, hand-carved wooden beads created in collaboration with community members, including those already engaged in our Call & Response and HOME programming. This project is supported by the Joyce Foundation through a 2021 Joyce Award to Daniel Minter and Lynden Sculpture Garden. More information on the Joyce Awards here: https://www.joycefdn.org/joyce-awards

On July 24, Daniel Minter will be offering an open-air carving workshop. Participants will create a personal symbol and carve it into a rubber block suitable for stamping and printing; carve low-relief wood blocks; or explore more advanced carving techniques. Images of the rubber stamps will become part of our project archive and will eventually be used in large textile banners. You will be able to take your stamp home with you. These workshops are open to people of all ages (small children will need to work with an adult). No previous carving skills required; advanced carvers welcome.

July 24, 2021 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm

Photo: Daniel McCullough
Sixteen Paths, 2021. Photo: Daniel McCullough.

Daniel Minter: Rootwork
June 20-September 26, 2021
Artist Reception: Saturday, July 24, 4-6 pm
FREE
Masks are required in the gallery.

Rootwork – to make repair well below the surface. To go deeper. To seek
the source of an issue. To look beyond the symptoms to identify the cause.

Rootwork (African American vernacular) – to use remedies rooted in
African spirituality to solve problems and influence nature. To use roots,
plants, and herbs for healing and influencing events.

Rootwork is the third iteration of “a distant holla,” an assemblage and collaging of Daniel Minter’s carvings, paintings, objects, and material created over a span of time but related by an ongoing personal narrative. Rootwork also includes new work but, as Minter says, “it’s all a continuum.” This collage-like approach to presenting his work runs counter to traditional ways of exhibiting art, with each work occupying its own space. “I've always wanted to commit things closer,” Minter observes. “I am working toward a practice where every piece that I make can have an intimate connection to whatever is connected to it. The notion that all things are connected is important to me.”

Rachel E. Harding, writing in the two essays appended below, describes Minter’s work as “an artwork reuniting Black people with their totems – the mythic resources and cultural sinew embedded in our historical experience” (2005) and as “a navigation system” (2019). According to Harding, Minter describes his art as “a technology; a mode of creativity that uses African diasporic sensibilities to enable an alternative understanding about the world; a way to recognize and access ancestral resources for individual and collective struggle.” Harding sees Minter’s work as both a strategy and a pedagogy, “instructing viewers in the essential elements of its language and suggesting ways to engage its multiple meanings” (2019).

The artist wants people to see the connections, not just between different works but between the themes and issues embedded in them. He intentionally repeats images, which he refers to as “keys,” in his work, where they appear in many forms, from tiny block prints to larger paintings. But always, this visual language--made up of “water and wind; fish and boats; musical instruments; brooms, axes and other implements of labor; bottles and bowls; Black people’s faces, bodies and hair; traditional foods like okra, black-eyed peas and greens; turtles; birds; and various representations of Spirit, the continuity of the lifeforce, and the power of healing in the world” (Harding, 2019)--is building and layering together a single concept.

Not only for African Americans, but for all of us, Daniel Minter is collecting the remnants, the totems, the simple images spilling with meaning, and giving them back to us as treasures, as lessons, as keys to our healing and our joy.
Rachel E. Harding, Daniel Minter’s Keys: Deciphering and Honoring Ordinary Blackness

This exhibition was a chance for Minter to use various mediums and techniques--carving, painting, printmaking--to name the things that are important to him: “The other realities that I see.” Minter adds, “I enjoy working with the materials at hand. Different materials are a way for me to express different sides to the story. Sometimes this requires soft, delicate, detailed work. Other times, it requires broad movement, heavy lines, rougher lines, or a different material altogether.”

Harding recognizes a “necessary usefulness and nurturing” in Minter’s work. She quotes Minter as saying, “My idea of the purpose of art is to give people ways of using their culture to solve everyday life problems.”

She continues, in her 2019 essay: “This emphasis on the utilitarian in his art is reflected in the metaphoric range of Minter’s symbols. Growing up in the small farming community of Ellaville, Georgia in the 1960s and 1970s, Minter’s vision and work emerged from the soil, sites, implements and histories of Black southern life. Minter’s art is heavy with gross materiality – thick planks of wood, found objects, metal, wire, stone, the heft of human presence in the world; and particularly, the physical and psychic weight of Black embodiment in the Americas, especially in the US Blackbelt South. And at the same time, there is an astonishing ephemerality in the work. Sometimes these two tendencies exist side by side, interwoven and conversing, in continuum.

“In some important ways, Minter’s mode aligns with that of other Black creatives – scholars, writers, musicians, dancers and visual artists – whose approach, sometimes considered afropessimist, acknowledges and explores the depth and breadth of the inherent antiblackness at the heart of modernity; its historicity; and the fact that it is not likely to disappear from the earth anytime soon…. What we see in Minter’s work is the profound recognition of the assault on, and the precarity of, Black life; melded to an equally essential emphasis on “another tone.” In fact, his greater accentuation is on the alternate timbres, which are also conceptual tools; those vital, transformative modes of being, that are cultivated over generations and that carry another meaning of the possible (an afrofuturist vision) at their heart. Minter’s art is the labor of tender excavation, unearthing the wisdom buried in the culture – sometimes deep in the terrain of memory, sometimes flat-footed in plain sight all around us. Minter’s vision helps us recognize and reinterpret the strengths and possibilities in a radically inclusive African American and Afro-diasporic vision of the world.”

Read more about Daniel Minter’s work:
Rachel E. Harding, Ph.D., Daniel Minter’s Keys: Deciphering and Honoring Ordinary Blackness, 2005
Rachel Elizabeth Harding, Quantum Exchange: The Diasporic Art of Daniel Minter

This exhibition and the residency of which it is a part, In the Healing Language of Trees: a natural act of transformation restructured for curing many ills, are supported by the Joyce Foundation through a 2021 Joyce Award to Daniel Minter and Lynden Sculpture Garden; the Brico Fund; the Chipstone Foundation; and the Greater Milwaukee Foundation.

About the Artist
Daniel Minter is an American artist known for his work in the mediums of painting and assemblage who works in varied media. His overall body of work deals with themes of displacement and diaspora, ordinary/extraordinary blackness; spirituality in the Afro Atlantic world; and the (re)creation of meanings of home. Minter’s work has been featured in numerous institutions and galleries including the Portland Museum of Art, Seattle Art Museum, Tacoma Art Museum, Bates College, University of Southern Maine, Center for Maine Contemporary Art, The David C. Driskell Center, and the Northwest African American Art Museum. As founding director of Maine Freedom Trails, he has helped highlight the history of the Underground Railroad and the abolitionist movement in New England. In 2018, Minter co-founded the Indigo Arts Alliance, a creative center in the city of Portland, Maine, dedicated to increasing the visibility of, and support for, Black and Brown artists. Indigo is the manifestation of a lifelong dream to create a place where art, ingenuity, social justice, and diasporic collaboration is seeded and nurtured.

July 25, 2021 - 12:00pm - 4:00pm

www.lyndensculpturegarden.org/calendar/home-dance-day

Visitors to Lynden must adhere to our social distance walking visitor guidelines.
FREE

This year, we are offering HOME 2021 as a series of dispersed events spanning the summer. These events will be small, in order to conform with public health guidelines, and will take place outdoors on Lynden’s grounds. We hope that these events, when taken together, will capture the spirit of art, food, and performance that we experienced at the HOME 2019 outdoor festival.

HOME Dance Day participants include The Kings of the Dance Floor (Tanzanian), Tessy Sheidun and Friends (Rwandan), Al-Ghurba Dabka Group presented by Hanan Refugee Relief Group (Palestinian), Nkauj Hmoob Laim Txias (Hmong), the Multicultural Club of South Division High School (Laotian and Indian), Cyenthia Vijayakumar of Aarambh-Indian Dance School (Indian), and Karen Milwaukee Youth Group (Karen/Burmese).

PROGRAM
12 pm - Nkauj Hmoob Laim Txias (Hmong)
12:15 pm - Kathak dance by Cynthia Vijayakumar of Aarambh - Indian Dance School (Indian) -- participatory session
1 pm - Al Ghurba Dabke Dance Group (Palestinian), presented by Hanan Refugee Relief Group -- participatory session
1:30 pm - Multicultural Club of South Division High School (Laotian and Indian)
1:45 pm - Karen Milwaukee Youth Group (Karen/Burmese)
2:30 pm - The Kings of the Dance Floor (Tanzanian)
3:30 pm - Tessy Sheidun and Friends (Rwandan)

Program and timing are subject to change

Cyenthia Vijayakumar is a Kathak dancer from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the Artistic Director of Aarambh – Indian Dance School, established in February 2019. Vijayakumar received intensive training in the Kathak dance style of Lucknow Gharana from Guru Murari Sharan Gupta and Gurus Hari and Chetna from Bangalore, India. She is currently training under Guru Sujatha Banerjee from London. With many accolades to her name, she was awarded the Sashimani Devadasi Yuva Pratibha Puraskar at the 2018 Devadasi International dance festival in Bhubaneswar, India, and the Nritya Shiromani Award at the 2018 Cuttack Mahotsav in Cuttack, India. She has performed extensively in India and the USA. She is also a 2018 IndianRaga Fellow. Kathak is a North Indian classical dance form comprised of rhythmic footwork, elegant stances, graceful movements and swift pirouettes. For HOME: Dance Day, Vijayakumar will perform a technical piece that is set on a 16-beat rhythmic cycle, followed by an interactive learning session with participants of any age.

The Kings of the Dance Floor is a Tanzanian dance group led by Amanda Alembe. Current members include Meshack Alembe, Bonne and others. With a style and synchronicity that is measured, balanced and upbeat, they dance accompanied by Tanzanian and African tunes, both cultural and traditional, and modern and pop.

Tessy Sheidun and Friends is a dance group created by Sheidun who is from Rwanda. A new but already-known face in the Milwaukee scene, by day Sheidun works in various public health and engagement positions, and by night she can be found offering further connection to the community through her expert emceeing skills and dance background. Tessy Sheidun and Friends will bring to any event, a festive and colorful atmosphere – an experience not to be missed.

Presented by Hanan Refugee Relief Group, Al-Ghurba Dabka Group is a Palestinian folklore dance troop based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, established in 2019 by a number of talented performers. The aim of the troop is to express the spirit of Arab/Palestinian folklore and culture through a combination of traditional and modern dance. After their performance, Al-Ghurba Dabka Group will invite the audience to join in a hands-on session to learn this traditional form of line dance.

Nkauj Hmoob Laim Txias (pronounced Gao Hmong Lie Xia) is a traditional Hmong dance group created by sisters Emily and Paxia Vang. Nkauj Hmoob Laim Txais means the gentle wind of a woman in Hmong. The dance group chose this name as it represented Hmong women from all walks of life. Nkauj Hmoob Laim Txias's core belief is to create an empowering, uplifting, and encouraging sisterhood. As a team, their mission is to promote discipline through dance and community outreach, while also competitively dancing at Hmong dance competitions throughout the Midwest.

Multicultural Club of South Division High School is a school-based club from the South side of Milwaukee organized by a group of highly artistic teenage students and overseen by school social worker and club advisor, Ms Manee Jadolon. Previously performing at HOME 2019 at the Lynden Sculpture Garden for World Refugee Day and other major events throughout the city, the Multicultural Club of South Division High School performs dances relevant to the students’ cultures and ethnicities from across continents and regions in the world. For HOME 2021, the club proudly presents Laotian and Indian dances.

Karen Milwaukee Youth Group will present traditional dance styles and forms from the Karen culture. With historic and indigenous roots to the Southeast Asian region – most reside along the Myanmar (Burma)-Thailand border today – the Karen people are deemed stateless in their own homeland. Resettling all over the globe as refugees, including here in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, community-based initiatives and organizations, such as the Karen Milwaukee Youth Group, aim to preserve, promote, and participate in all things Karen. The Karen Milwaukee Youth Group perform movement and dance that is exclusive to their ethnic group, offeriing a unique opportunity for the public to observe and appreciate.

For a complete listing of HOME 2021 events, click here.

July 26, 2021 - 2:00pm - 6:00pm

2021_MDTN_Lynden_Web_FB


Fee: $5 per workshop/$10 day pass (3 workshops) for MDTN members; $8 per workshop/$16 day pass (3 workshops) for non-members
Registration: Space is limited; advance registration required. Register online or by phone at 414-446-8794.

Milwaukee Dance Theatre Network (MDTN) invites dancers, movement-based actors, and the greater Milwaukee community to participate in Milwaukee Dance + Theatre Community Day at Lynden Sculpture Garden. Join in for an afternoon for community, connection, and collaborative practice in the realms of Theatre + Dance. Show up, network, walk around the grounds and enjoy the beauty of Lynden Sculpture Garden. Sign up for a variety of workshop offerings open to all who want to participate. The event features 45-minute workshops throughout the afternoon led by Mauriah Donegan Kraker, Kerensa De Mars (Studio K Flamenco), Betty Salamun (DanceCircus), plus a workshop in physical theatre. Milwaukee Dance + Theatre Community Day takes place on Monday, July 26th from 2pm-6pm at Lynden Sculpture Garden. For more information, visit https://www.mkedancetheatrenetwork.org/community-day.

Schedule
• 2-2:45 pm | HOW TO CREATE A FLASH GATHERING/DANCE with Betty Salamun/DanceCircus (DANCE)
• 2-2:45 pm | Physical Theatre with Brian Rott
• 3:15- 4 pm | Flamenco with Kerensa DeMars/Studio K Flamenco (DANCE)
• 4:15 pm | Community networking/drone photo! FREE/NO Sign up necessary
• 5-5:45 pm | Practicing the Present Moment with Mauriah Donegan Kraker (CROSSOVER)

July 26, 2021 - 7:30pm

Forest-of-Vanishing-Stars-ARC-cover-scaled

Margy Stratton, founder and executive producer of Milwaukee Reads produces this series of events featuring writers of particular interest to women.

Lynden Sculpture Garden's Women's Speaker Series and Boswell Books welcome Kristin Harmel, author of The Forest of Vanishing Stars, to Milwaukee for a virtual, BYOS (bring-your-own-snack) event on Monday, July 26, 2021 at 7:30 pm.

Fee: Tickets are $5 plus sales tax and ticket fee or you can upgrade to admission-with book. Books can be picked up at Boswell or for an additional fee, shipped out be USPS media mail. $5 from each ticket will be donated back to the Lynden Sculpture Garden.
Registration: Purchase tickets for the virtual event here.

For more information on upcoming Women's Speaker Series Events, click here.

About The Forest of Vanishing Stars

The New York Times bestselling author of the “heart-stopping tale of survival and heroism” (People) The Book of Lost Names returns with an evocative coming-of-age World War II story about a young woman who uses her knowledge of the wilderness to help Jewish refugees escape the Nazis—until a secret from her past threatens everything.

After being stolen from her wealthy German parents and raised in the unforgiving wilderness of eastern Europe, a young woman finds herself alone in 1941 after her kidnapper dies. Her solitary existence is interrupted, however, when she happens upon a group of Jews fleeing the Nazi terror. Stunned to learn what’s happening in the outside world, she vows to teach the group all she can about surviving in the forest—and in turn, they teach her some surprising lessons about opening her heart after years of isolation. But when she is betrayed and escapes into a German-occupied village, her past and present come together in a shocking collision that could change everything.

Based partially on incredible true stories of survival against staggering odds, and suffused with the kind of journey from the wilderness that made Where the Crawdads Sing a worldwide phenomenon, The Forest of Vanishing Stars is a heart-wrenching and suspenseful novel from the #1 internationally bestselling author whose writing has been hailed as “sweeping and magnificent” (Fiona Davis, New York Times bestselling author), “immersive and evocative” (Publishers Weekly), and “gripping” (Tampa Bay Times).

About the Author

Kristin Harmel is the New York Times bestselling, USA Today bestselling, and #1 international bestselling author of The Book of Lost Names, The Winemaker’s Wife, and a dozen other novels that have been translated into twenty-nine languages and are sold all over the world.

A former reporter for PEOPLE magazine, Kristin has been writing professionally since the age of 16, when she began her career as a sportswriter, covering Major League Baseball and NHL hockey for a local magazine in Tampa Bay, Florida in the late 1990s. After stints covering health and lifestyle for American Baby, Men’s Health, and Woman’s Day, she became a reporter for PEOPLE magazine while still in college and spent more than a decade working for the publication, covering everything from the Super Bowl to high-profile murders to celebrity interviews. Her favorite stories at PEOPLE, however, were the “Heroes Among Us” features—tales of ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

In addition to a long magazine writing career (which also included articles published in Travel + Leisure, Glamour, Ladies’ Home Journal, Every Day with Rachael Ray, and more), Kristin was also a frequent contributor to the national television morning show The Daily Buzz and has appeared on Good Morning America and numerous local television morning shows.

Kristin was born just outside Boston, Massachusetts and spent her childhood there, as well as in Columbus, Ohio, and St. Petersburg, Florida. After graduating with a degree in journalism (with a minor in Spanish) from the University of Florida, she spent time living in Paris and Los Angeles and now lives in Orlando, with her husband and young son. She is also the co-founder and co-host of the weekly web show and podcast Friends & Fiction.

July 27, 2021 - 10:30am

June 11 - Bugs

Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:15 am
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): Tuesdays, 10:30 am-11:30 am
Sessions meet outdoors. In the event of rain, a make-up session will meet the following week.

Tuesdays in the Garden, designed for children aged 1-3, provides a nurturing environment where children’s curiosity and wonder are extended through play and exploration, and children and their caregivers learn and discover side-by-side. Join art educators Claudia Orjuela and Denice Niebuhr for hands-on art making and all-senses-engaged exploration of the outdoor world at Lynden. We’ll consider different themes, each designed to connect Lynden’s environment with children’s interests. We will encourage experimentation and the manipulation of art and natural materials to tell stories, solve problems, and develop relationships. Masks required for adults. Social distancing will be practiced at all times. To view our Guidelines for Parent-and-Child, Youth Workshops, click here.

Fee: Winter & Spring Session (Jan. 12-May 25): $12/9 members for one adult and one child.
Summer Session (June 8-Aug. 24): $16/$12 members for one adult and one child.
Registration: Registration: Group size is limited; advance registration is required. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration does not guarantee admission. Once we receive your completed registration form, we will follow up via e-mail with an invoice for payment and a confirmation after payment is received OR a notification that you have been placed on the waiting list for the session(s) you have requested. Register online now.

Schedule:

Sessions in red are full. To be added to the waitlist, complete registration here.
March 9 - Signs of Spring
April 13 - Trees are Our Friends
April 27 - Trees are Our Friends
May 11 - Gardening at Lynden
May 25 - Gardening at Lynden
June 8 - Seed Bombs
June 15 - Seed Bombs
June 22 - Garden Animals
June 29 - Garden Animals
July 6 - Pond Critters
July 13 - Pond Critters
July 20 - Plant Dyes
July 27 - Plant Dyes
August 3 - Nature's Kitchen
August 10 - Nature’s Kitchen
August 17 - Wearable Camouflage
August 24 - Wearable Camouflage

July 29, 2021 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

RefugeeAMemoir-EmmanuelMbolela

3 sessions:
Thursday, June 24, 2021
Thursday, July 29, 2021
Thursday, August 19, 2021

Fee: Free.
Registration: This discussion takes place via Zoom; advance registration required. Click here to register.

Lynden and the HOME Refugee Steering Committee begin the new year by launching a book discussion group for those interested in firsthand accounts of displacement. We will consider works of non-fiction, including autobiographical and semi-autobiographical works, by writers who have faced or are facing forced displacement as refugees, asylum seekers, and immigrants. Where stories of persecution, historical trauma, and loss of livelihood are effortlessly conveyed by storytellers, journalists, and humanitarians who search out or stumble upon the lives of refugees, we seek out the words of those to whom these stories belong: the narrators who are the closest to their own stories, and the stories of their people, friends, family and, of course, refugees.

We encourage you to read each book in advance (see information below on acquiring the current selection). Then join us for a virtual discussion moderated by Lynden’s Kim Khaira. We expect the group to meet bimonthly, and we will be seeking the input of group members on titles to consider in the future.

We continue the series with Emmanuel Mbolela's Refugee: A Memoir (2021). Originally published in German, Mbolela, a notable Congolese activist and advocate of refugee issues in Germany, tells his personal story, having gone through the journey that refugees and those that face forced displacement know too well. He carries the reader through his direct experience of human trafficking and deplorable living conditions, and questions the harrowing experience that refugees face in the search of finding asylum. Mbolela's work, deemed both personal and collective, provides an individual perspective and a critical global outlook to the lives of refugees around the world.

As part of our HOME work at Lynden, we are making the book available without charge to book discussion group participants. If you would like us to purchase a copy of the book for you, please indicate this when completing the registration form. We will contact you when the book is available and you will be able to pick it up at the Lynden Sculpture Garden, 2145 West Brown Deer Road, Milwaukee, WI 53217.

If you prefer to support your local public library by borrowing the book, you can find Milwaukee County libraries here or other local libraries here. If you would like to purchase the book yourself, Boswell Books will be offering it at a 10% discount to book group participants. The book can be purchased at the store (you will find it among the book club selections) or on the Boswell website with the 10% book club discount already applied. We will post that link as soon as we have it. Please check Boswell’s website to check the availability of the book, and to confirm hours and delivery options.

PREVIOUS READINGS
Dina Nayeri's The Ungrateful Refugee: What Immigrants Never Tell You January-February 2021
Kao Kalia Yang's Somewhere in the Unknown World: A Collective Refugee Memoir March-May 2021


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